Malaysia

Postcard From Mount Kinabalu

Sometime in May 2016 John Huong had just descended from having successfully reached Low’s Peak and was resting at Laban Rata before continuing on his descend down to Timpohon Gate. I can’t remember if I saw his status on Facebook or Instagram but I was quick to ask for a favour while it was still convenient and that was to mail me a postcard from the highest post office in Malaysia — located right next to Mountain TORQ’s Pendant Hut at 3,289m above sea level.

I walked past this very post box during my climb a month earlier and it didn’t hit me at the time that it might have been a functioning one until I chanced upon a web page that said it’s “certified the highest post box by Malaysia Book of Records.”  John picked the postcard of St John’s Peak and gave me an exciting addition to my growing collection of postcards from around the world.

Google 'shimworld postcards' and you'll see a couple of blog posts of my postcard collection from senders around the world including Bruneian friends who took precious time out of their holiday to send me one sometimes two. Thank you very much! Here's a unique one of them all — mailed in by trail runner friend @laribananaz after he successfully completed his Mount Kinabalu climb in May 2016. Location: Next to Mountain TORQ’s Pendant Hut Elevation: 3,289 metres above sea level Date of installation: 14th February, 2015 Certified highest post box by the Malaysia Book of Records All outgoing mail receive the Mount Kinabalu post office ink stamp. John, I have finally visited Kuching 😎 #sabah #malaysia #kotakinabalu #postcard #postoffice #shimworld #mountain #MountKinabalu #trailrunning #gunungkinabalu #mountaintorq

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Malaysia

Climbing Mount Kinabalu Ranau Trail

If you’re unable to view all photos in the album, click this direct link
Photos: Canon PowerShot G5 X and Samsung Galaxy Note5

Our mountain guide was a young, patient gentleman who let us take our time descending from Low's Peak with a view of the iconic South Peak in the distance (second photo). And taking our time I did being the last one (not counting the other brave souls attempting their Via Ferrata some stones away) Compared to my miserably wet and depressing 2013 climb this one was godsend nevermind that the sun was up in full force and I was still moving snail pace soaking up the gorgeous, breathtaking but often nauseating (not a great fan of all things altitude) panoramic views owing to perfect weather. I took this rare opportunity to take as many pictures as my semi-numbed fingers could handle. 📷 Jan Shim Photography #mountain #mountainclimbing #MountKinabalu #malaysia #sabah #kotakinabalu #shimworld #fitness #sunny #landscape #photography #photographer #mountaintop #panorama #serene #cold #amazingborneo #janshimphotography

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Malaysia

Competing in the 3rd Canada Hill Trail Challenge 2015

Fast forward two years after my first Canada Hill hike on 20th October 2013, friends who learned that I had registered for the 3rd Canada Hill Trail Challenge asked what made me decide to sign up for the race (I’m not known in my circle of friends to join races) to which I replied, “I have unfinished business to settle at Canada Hill.”

Those who have never driven up to Canada Hill, check out the magnificent view of Miri City photographed (on a haze free morning) from a spot adjacent to Hazard Bistro.

Looking at the left log below, 1.93km is hardly the sort of distance to drive to Miri for. We stopped short of however much more we could have gone because a member wasn’t feeling 100% so we all decided to stop. If someone had asked if I would be interested to participate two years ago, I would not even have given it a second thought. So much has changed in the two years since I began working out — I’m better prepared today, mentally and physically, for such demanding races — a long way to go before I find comfort in racing tougher and longer trail distances!

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Participation would not have been possible if not for my hiking buddies (they too trained at Bukit Shahbandar for their Mount Kinabalu climb) from Miri who agreed last minute to sign up for the race!
Participation would not have been possible if not for my hiking buddies from Miri See Fong (middle) and Jackie (right) who agreed last minute to sign up for the race! They too made a greater effort to drive all the way to Bukit Shahbandar to train for their own Mount Kinabalu climb after mine.
My typical gear and hydration for a 6.2km Bukit Shahbandar hike/run except for the extra shirts I packed due to forecast for thunderstorm. On race day it was sunny and hot.
My typical gear and hydration for a 6.2km Bukit Shahbandar hike/run except for the extra shirts I packed due to forecast for thunderstorm. On race day it was sunny and hot. At the end of the trail I had some fluids left from the 2L pack. It would be best to pack an extra bottle or two (soya bean works wonders for me) for peace of mind. There was no way to tell if I wasn’t running out of water unless I removed the backpack to check.
Unlike Bukit Shahbandar or Tasek Lama hills in Brunei, Canada Hill is forest in a valley characterized by many steep slopes compounded by very little to no wind throughout the course.
Unlike Bukit Shahbandar or Tasek Lama hills in Brunei, Canada Hill is forest in a valley characterized by many steep slopes compounded by very little to no wind throughout the course. Photo: Samsung Galaxy Note 5
I split up from Jackie and See Fong right from the start only to regroup before the finish line. Photo courtesy of Bulatan Runners Club, Miri.
I separated from Jackie and See Fong right from the start of the race only to regroup before the finish line. Photo courtesy of Bulatan Park Runners Club, Miri.
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I had no idea what I signed up for! Men’s Open 4.72km didn’t seem all that long a distance considering I average 4.75km between Bukit Shahbandar 9 and 14 hills route although I train mostly on the 3.2km trail. However, it’s as I commented in my Facebook post (link at top of this post) Canada Hill is a completely different beast of a terrain.

I observed that many participants were dressed light in that they were competing in the same Men’s Open 4.7km category and were entirely reliant on the water stations for hydration; they brought no water bottles of their own to speak of. Quite a number of them were dehydrated with one or two around me were suffered fatigue and cramps because they ran the Curtin University Warrior Run just the day before. If organizers happen to be reading this (and I hope they pick up on this important feedback), the first water station was unnecessary (too close to the start of event) and the second (which is also the last) one too far apart. Fortunately I had 2L of fluids on my back and was taking sips throughout the hike due to the stifling heat and exhaustion.

Now that I’ve hiked a distance more than twice that of my first attempt what do I think of Canada Hill? Coming from someone who according to my friends is a sucker for pain, I can see myself going back for leisure hikes. It’s not as hike friendly as Bukit Shahbandar or Tasek Lama trails but man, Canada Hill is one attraction that will also give you an upper body workout. The only question is finding like-minded buddies to join me.

Thanks to my wife who drove me to Miri, and my Miri buddies for changing their minds about participating, I got to earn my first trail medal, second only in my collection after Mount Kinabalu climb. Will I be back for the 4th Canada Hill Trail Challenge next year? It’s too early to say with any degree of certainly but I don’t see any reason to not sign up! 🙂

Now, for those who have never visited Bukit Shahbandar in Brunei and would like to find your way around the trails (first-time visitors getting lost is not uncommon) be sure to you have the Bukit Shahbandar Trail Map with you at all times. Even better is downloading MapMyHike App, import a route and hike with GPS assistance.

I did say I was going to come home with a medal …

and did exactly that — a Men’s Open 4.7km Finisher Medal (completion indicated by the three coloured strings around my neck collected from three checkpoints). Out of a total of 580 participants, there were 30 Bruneians who pained our way through the forest to finish on a high note!