NIKE ACG SIDEWINDER

Ever since I was convinced to invest in a good pair of casual footwear (good referring to aesthetics as much as comfort), I’ve developed a taste funky sandals to go with my line of GAP/ESPRIT clothing for work and casual wear which if you noticed there’s absolutely no distinction unless the situation calls for penguin wear! It all began with a pair of BEETLEBUG sandals, artistic and oversized, and I went on to a second pair that’s not quite as colourful. I thought they were cool until I came across these NIKE ACG SIDEWINDER! ACG stands for All Conditions Gear and when you have a pair you’ll understand why!


NIKE SIDEWINDER © Jan Shim Photography

Inside the box, the footwear is wrapped with what appears to be recycled paper and on which is printed …

Thanks for trusting us with your feet. We believe the best times are often unplanned activity in the in-between spaces with friends from coffee shops to base camp. This shoe is not only packed full of innovation, but it’s very easy to understand and fun to wear. We hope you’re inspired to practice random outdoor explorations and spontaneous adventures. JUST DO IT!

Sounds like typical day for me and Nike understands my needs! Best of several worlds in one package. Too bad sandals still aren’t considered “business casual” items!


© Jan Shim Photography

So does NIKE understand the footwear business? You bet! The NIKE SIDEWINDER CI is a sandal fused with sticky rubber sole where I suspect the traction may come in handy someday. What intrigued me when I caught sight of the Sidewinder is the use of leather upper, cork and Poli U midsole. I was convinced by the store that the the midsole is made of high tech material that promotes fast drying when wet so I was assured that it’s not going to stink. I do wear my sandals in practically all terrains as long the element of risks isn’t there. I put my footwear through the elements—fresh water, sea water, sand and mud–whatever and wherever is needed to get the shot.


© Jan Shim Photography

What is NIKE CONSIDERED? I pulled an explanation out of Wikipedia …

The Nike Considered line utilizes materials found primarily within 200 miles of the Nike factory which reduces the energy used for transportation, diminishing the resulting climate change impact. The manufacturing process reduces solvent use by more than 80% compared with Nike’s typical products. The leather comes from a tannery that recycles wastewater to ensure toxins are kept out of the environment, and it is colored using vegetable-based dyes. Hemp and polyester are used to make the shoe’s woven upper and shoelaces. The midsole is cut to lock into the outer sole, reducing the need for toxic adhesives. The shoe’s outer sole includes rubber made from recycled factory rubber waste.

16 thoughts on “NIKE ACG SIDEWINDER

  1. Does Nike understand the footwear business? Philip Knight has an MBA from Stanford GSB and of course he understands the business well. Apologies for the bias.

    Always thrilled reading Jan Shim. It is a journey truly lived!

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  2. Everyday, people swear by these four letter words (besides the other four letter words, of course) and I’ve come to realise over the years that the most successful companies in the world believe in the less is more philosophy.

    NIKE, COKE, SHIM ….. you get the idea!

    (I’m biased too and completely unapologetic!)

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  3. That’s a nice pair of sandals. I usually wear regular bathroom slippers, what we Bruneian refer to as “Slipar Jepun”, if I wanna go all out casual, but these Nikes would totally replace that, and there won’t probably be $2 a pair either, would they ? 😛

    And where can we get seriously original Nike goods ? 😀

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  4. The Nike Sidewinder is now my first choice for going that doesn’t require shoes. Next is my trusty artsy BettleBug that I’ve sent to a cobbler to get a worn out part fixed. Where shoes are preferred dress code, I have another pair of BeetleBug to accommodate the protocol.

    And where can we get seriously original Nike goods? Originality in a globalised economy? I don’t think you can find Made in USA Nike products anymore (in the moments leading up to replying you, I Googled and found several hits that kinda confirmed this suspicion). Let’s not go there!

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  5. Dear Jan Shim,

    Insightful as usual :0

    Interesting to read that Nike or Coca Cola -US emblems aren’t they?- is a reality in Brunei. I actually wonder if there are many US companies expanding in Brunei and by extension how the Asian countries are open to foreign/US investors/economy. This question popped up in my mind since my trip to South-East Asia where I saw numerous US brands. The amount was that I could have the illusion to visit the States instead of Asia^^

    Yeah, I admit it is good for consumers that foreign brands are available over the world –“democratisation” of the products offer for “everyone”. That’s surely the part of globalisation that allows to have a bite of the world in one country. However is it “needed” to sell the foreign brands at -such- a higher price than the market price? I read foreign brands are in Asia a landmark for status. After I saw Gap sold at least the double than in the States in Korea, it makes sense! I just hope the foreign brands will soon be something else than status in Asia (at least I saw/read about China and Korea)…

    You pointed to the “Made in USA” products availability. Well I would view it associated with the wave of outsourcing that many (European) companies have followed. Besides the savings of money, I wonder about the “benefits” of outsourcing. Surely there are some, but … What is the charm of the “all Made in China” -with all my respect for Chinese, no misunderstanding!? What is the choice when it is limited this way? Can the consumers choose a product if they want to ethically purchase -with respect of human rights, environment friendly policies ?

    Regarding the question of global economy… I would not go that far, because I am not a specialist but just observing what is going on here and there ^^ Global economy is in the debate section of magazines, talking about fears or enthusiasm, like for everything (rather) new. Some newspapers or magazines say that Europe “protects” its economic interests. No idea whether it is true or not, but I realise there are not as many US shops here as there are in the countries I visited in Asia. Starbucks for example is not (yet) at every corner in Denmark (not sure of the other European countries though). Maybe some enthusiasts in economic could say….?

    PS: sorry for the length of this post…

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  6. Mana beli? Brapa harga?

    Hua Ho Yayasan and I’ve not seen them anywhere else. I once spotted a pair of sandals at the Nike section but only to be disappointed at the only pair left in stock and not my size (a common problem with Size 9 apparently). They cost a month’s rental of our Espeed broadband (the old rate)! 🙂

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  7. I promise to not check the price of the brand you mentioned in your new article ehehe 😉 Actually my wonder was about the status of brands, when they “transfer” from “home business” to other countries. To put this in perspective:
    Production cost is decreased as nowadays many articles are made in China, India… Shipment of articles is not a factor to explain the extra cost in an Asian country (compared to the States for example). While I am aware of marketing strategy, I still do not find fair that some countries cannot buy their favourite articles at a “fair” price -already considered the different costs of each country.

    And yeah the sole design of your sandals looks arty, plus “charming” with the ethnic touch of Chinese (?) characters.

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  8. I promise to not check the price of the brand you mentioned in your new article ehehe Actually my wonder was about the status of brands, when they “transfer” from “home business” to other countries.

    Resistance is Futile! I’m curious, if you find branded items so morally wrong, what’s your poison if not the pleasure from shopping? You are in Europe, a coutry that epitomizes branded shopping but I’m curious if that might not be the case. Do share how you have managed to avoid the lure of brand shopping in the time you’ve lived there.

    Shipment of articles is not a factor to explain the extra cost in an Asian country (compared to the States for example). While I am aware of marketing strategy, I still do not find fair that some countries cannot buy their favourite articles at a “fair” price -already considered the different costs of each country.

    When I was in IT, we were distributor for an American computer brand and whenever we would receive a consignment that actually arrived from the States, the cost would always have factored in some sort of “duty” for items sold into Asian countries. I think this is no longer practised today especially with manufacturing now based out of Asia. Questioning the profit magins companies make is a tiring exercise in futility and leads no where from personal observation.

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  9. Dear Jan,

    Thanks for the discussion 🙂

    I’m curious, if you find branded items so morally wrong, what’s your poison if not the pleasure from shopping? You are in Europe, a country that epitomizes branded shopping but I’m curious if that might not be the case.

    Yes, you are right about Europe & brands. The relationship between brands and customers is surely similar here as in Asia.

    No, I do not consider branded shopping as morally wrong. Actually to me nothing is (morally) good or bad, shopping included ^^ It all depends on how you use things. As you know, brands are often creative, can be a part of the personality thanks to their designs.

    If it goes to the extreme, then it can be questionable (regarding the value of an object, the relations between people…) e.g. kids here sometimes choose/reject fellows depending on the kind of brands they wear… Luckily it is not commonplace 🙂

    Well, judgement will lead nowhere. One could keep in mind what is important in life in general for oneself, others and in interaction with others to make it smooth for everybody. There is a saying about individual liberty and its limits…

    Questioning the profit margins companies make is a tiring exercise in futility and leads no where from personal observation.

    My idea is far from “demonizing” companies or the economy, you know. They have a vital interest. The company cannot completely control the price of an item in a certain country. Therefore the profit margins of a company do not reflect much. There are other factors that explain a higher price in country A than country B. That’s where I think it is interesting to go to…

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  10. i bought these slippers and i admit the design is awesome but its not that good. its smells after it gets wet which does not happened to my other nike rubber flip flops or my birkenstock. aside from this the cork is easily removed. the soles are soft and comfortable but can be a disadvantage when it comes to rough terrain since you could feel sharp rocks poking at your feet.

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    1. You’re absolutely right. This is one that shouldn’t be part of the ACG family. It’s anything but All Conditions and my pair went mouldy after a period of inactivity. I haven’t worn it enough for the pieces to come apart yet.

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