A WORKING SUNDAY

Weekends are sacred or so I tell myself and actually make an effort not to accept work assignments on either Sat or Sun. Unfortunately, wedding photographers warriors do not have this luxury and for this reason, I chose to spend my weekends with the family instead of newly weds who are at the beginning their ever-after journey. Balancing my freelance schedule with my wife’s corporate and the children’s extended school hours can be a daunting task leaving us just Sunday, if we’re lucky!

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© Jan Shim Photography

These foreign workers who slave in our tropical heat day in and day out, for instance, do not have this luxury. Just last Sunday, I had some left over work with a leading hardware and roofing materials supplier. Having acquainted myself with their territorial sales folks over ten separate shoots, this last bit of the work I decided to finish off alone. Armed with just an address and vaguely remembering the whereabouts of the completed Chicken Coop, it took me longer than expected finding the right place. Unlike the traditional coop which is made of wood and roofing of some sort, this project utilitised full metal trusses (the base structure) for ultimate durability. You see, I wasn’t expecting to see workers at the site on Sunday yet there were more than a handful of busy bees putting the roof top on the coop.

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© Jan Shim Photography

Before the materials end up on the work site, there are many other workers at the factory where they produce the building materials and associated accessories. The factory houses heavy machinery that produces different types of metal roofing with experienced personnel operating them.

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© Jan Shim Photography

It’s an interesting change away from the usual corporate scene. Here there are no men dressed in suits but coveralls, hard hats and dirt. Lots of dirt—I once soaked my entire left foot in mud at a construction site I was shooting and each step I risked stepping on sharp pointy objects. Still, a much needed change of scene.

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© Jan Shim Photography

12 thoughts on “A WORKING SUNDAY

  1. You make dreary work look so fashionable and vogue !😀

    And Jan, maybe you should put the kit/exif info after every article, heheh. I wanna know what kit you’re using, too.😛

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  2. I’m just wondering, what lens did you use for the photos in this post? The dof is so yummy, I want that too.

    I figured by now you already know my favourite body and lens combo—the EOS 5D and 70-200mm f/2.8 IS. This is one of the reasons, if not the only reason why full frame is so desirable. In my very limited technical knowledge of DOF and sensor size, it is widely understood that full frame sensor great affects DOF. A quote from a source, “DOF is determined by both aperture and image magnification on the sensor plane, the wider the aperture and the greater the magnification the shallower the DOF.” If you have the same lens (70-200mm f/2.8) but you aren’t getting such “yummy” DOF on your 1.6x Crop sensor body, that’s why!

    I came across this from a forum, “the FF cameras with large photosites like 5D or D3 and resulting high ISO 1 stop advantage you could argue that it would be true for low light as well (in other words an F4 lens on 5D at ISO 800 = 2.8 lens on say 30D at ISO 400).” I once tested this theory with an associate who shoots Nikon D200. At the same scene and both f/2.8 lens, the light meter reading and resulting image captured seemed to prove this theory to be correct!

    You make dreary work look so fashionable and vogue !

    These construction workers are the real deal, the building blocks of our nation from the ground up, in a literal sense of the word. I’m happy to be able to feature them for the second time after SPARE A THOUGHT ON AIDILFITRI.

    And Jan, maybe you should put the kit/exif info after every article, heheh. I wanna know what kit you’re using, too.

    On EXIF info, have you spared a moment to think just how useful this out of camera info really is? These images are post-processed to varying degrees and the end result may be far from the originally recorded parameters? For this, I see no point adding information that doesn’t honestly communicate with its audience (other than clutter). The availability of FF sensors shifting DOF just makes EXIF info more confusing. Besides, post-processing is the other half of the equation that makes the business of digital-SLR photography that much more interesting.🙂

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  3. those guys are just as important as those in suits, these images clearly shows that. brings to me a greater appreciation to the men like these who are often forgotten. great work again Jan, ha its funny every time i brief myself on what to expect from your work, i still find myself marveled at the end of each article, keep up the good work.

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  4. Jan, ha its funny every time i brief myself on what to expect from your work, i still find myself marveled at the end of each article, keep up the good work.

    Thanks Vern. Seriously, I wish I could see things from your perspective—an outsider not from within the Asian community. I’ve seen this phenomenon over and over when we learn from visitors to our humble abode what they enjoy about their stay and the places of interests and so forth. I’m beginning to see and appreciate my work own from this other dimension.

    Forget the EXIF info then, just enlighten us with the PP info. Heheh

    It’s not unusual to get asked to “spill” although it’s no secret that I am not a fan of Photoshop having begun my photo editing learning curve with Paint Shop Pro. There you go, I post-process my photographs using an obsolete piece of software [chuckle]. I enjoy using simple software that runs fast to get the work done similarly I like the simplicity of the EOS 5D and 20D. Another piece of news that may surprise many is that I do not shoot RAW unless required by the clients where commercial printers require files submitted in 8/16-bit TIFF. But there are things I like ’em only RAW and no other way!🙂

    While I’m in this mood, let me take this moment to rant. After a short but intense 4+ years in the photography business. Perfectly good and capable software became bloated and require more computing power to run at decent speed. When camera manufacturers cannot build cameras with accurate auto focus capabilities, they cram more electronics to make cameras more sophisticated than they need to be! Progress? Perhaps but I prefer to keep things simple!

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  5. Oh man, I sure did learn something here. No wonder the photos at http://www.pixels-n-grains.com are so yummy, even when the photos were shot at ISO1600!

    I was wondering if there was such thing as a noise reduction function in the Canon 5D. I rummaged through the poor little 400D in my hands for such setting to reduce the noise but to no avail. Well, your reply explains it all then! =D

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  6. Wow ! You get all those great shots by using an outdated software and by keeping things simple! Unbelievable!

    Guess what, pretty soon the new EOS 5D successor is going to be available and I’ll be shoot with an outdated camera and post processing with outdate software!🙂

    nice post man, call me when yr in banda ya, ill buy u lunch

    Whoa! I had no idea my client for this shoot also reads this blog. OK bro, lunch on ya!

    Spectacular! Documentary Set.

    Jim, I had a look @ your photographs. The Joshua Tree picture is amazing! From time to time, someone posts photos of Joshua Trees and each time I see one I cannot believe they’re real. Well done!

    Oh man, I sure did learn something here. No wonder the photos at http://www.pixels-n-grains.com are so yummy, even when the photos were shot at ISO1600!

    Believe it or not, under the right conditions even ISO 3200 is usable on the 5D. Where photo grain is desired, the 5D’s noise isn’t conducive to satisfying this as the presence of digital noise is pretty evident unlike the new Digic III processor on the 1DMkIII and 1DsMkIII where the grains are said to be closer to that of film grain. Again, there are filters that convert digital noise to film grain for those who desire such output.

    I was wondering if there was such thing as a noise reduction function in the Canon 5D. I rummaged through the poor little 400D in my hands for such setting to reduce the noise but to no avail. Well, your reply explains it all then! =D

    If you visit photography forums, the EOS 5D is a highly regarded piece of equipment and it’s frequently used to compare against more recent bodies from Canon and Nikon platform [Chuckles!] considering the 5D is a few years old but being full frame has its inherent privileges.

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